minxs
Clownfish
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Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 16, 10 7:18 PM
AuntieJulie wrote:Thank you for clarifying the punchcard situation Minxs. Sadly, like you, I buy a lot of games per month and have already reached my punch card limit - still, the CE version is still available next month if I can't find anything else to buy - problem is, I've got 8 games on my want to buy list..........

I'm hearing from many more people than I expected, that they have the same problem. I perhaps foolishly thought that only a few people reguarly buy 6 games a month.

That being so, it seems even more of a win-win for BF to address this problem. We are, after all, your best customers! We continue to pay our $7 for game membership and support BF by continuing to buy CEs despite constant advice to "wait, it's not worth it".

And I will keep on buying CEs, even if the extras aren't that great, just for the perk of playing RIGHT NOW. But only if this credit-loss issue is addressed. Otherwise, I just can't justify throwing away that many credits, even for the ability to play right away.

I do have SOME will power, even when it comes to BF games! (Not much -- but SOME.)

 
minxs
Clownfish
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Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 16, 10 7:54 PM
scarlet_11dy6 wrote: Graphix were very well done & not an historical anachronism in the bunch.

Great review, thanks for the extra info -- I only deleted b/c of space.

I forgot to mention that there were no historical anachronisms among the hidden objects! I LOVE that!

Sleepy Hollow is another H.O. game that's very accurate, although they have do a typewriter, which wasn't invented until the 1870s, nowhere near the colonial period during which the story is set. Historical accuracy shows a level of thoughtfulness, research, and truth to the period which I really appreciate. One of the small but very worthwhile parts of this game.

The interactive bits weren't strenuous on the brain to figure out & I liked that you could go back & forth btwn different map locations to play.

Think I did mention this, but yes, yes, yes. It can't be praised too much. SO much easier than running, or clicking, back & forth as with Dire Grove and many others. It would be coolest of all to have a choice, though!

And for y'all that are sighing over yet another glut o blood, hey, horror sells well & has sold since Mary Shelley's day, & has made Stephen King a millionaire. I'd rather play a game based upon an old book I've read & loved than some trashy modern romance novel no one's ever heard of any day of the wk. I still don't get what people see in Danielle Steel's re-hashing of the same old plot LOL Bring on the classic literature!

Totally agree! I hope they keep up with the "Penny Dreadfuls" series. The underlyiing story may be 18th-c. but that name -- Penny Dreadfuls -- is SO Victorian.

People have always read, and enjoyed, horrific and hair-raising stories! I'd love to see a game based on something by Dickens. Or how about The Monk? LOL!

Edited on 01/16/2010 at 8:03:14 PM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
Clownfish
615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 17, 10 4:57 AM
Well, after playing another chapter, I have to eat my words about anachronisms not being in this game. I found:

-- a pretzel
-- a tourist-size totem pole
-- matches? (could have been poisonous white phosphorus)
-- dentures (would have been called false teeth, and wouldn't have looked so realistic)
-- garlic?
-- a yam?
-- a picture postcard
-- a ballerina figurine in a tutu
-- a modern pencil (graphite core in round wooden holder)
-- a teddy bear
-- a chili pepper? (might be in period)
-- a bell pepper (definitely anachronistic)
-- the small house in the apothecary jars puzzle is of late Victorian design

(The clothes are generally 18th century in style, especially in the dress shop, so despite some Victorian elements, apparently the story is taken from the 18th-century original, String of Pearls.)


Edited on 01/17/2010 at 5:09:13 AM PST


 
ras7777
Seahorse
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30 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by ras7777 on Jan 17, 10 5:51 AM
Good game, I really enjoyed it but... WARNING: BF site advertises Exclusive Hidden Object scenes in the CE. The Hidden Object scenes and puzzles unlocked the CE are the SAME ones you just played in the game. You are not getting any EXTRA Hidden Object scenes and puzzles! Not worth the extra money for the CE if that is what you are expecting.

 
bl4716
Seahorse
Seahorse
21 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by bl4716 on Jan 17, 10 8:58 AM
I absolutely LOVED this game!! I'm pretty picky...I want a game that actually has a reasonable story line and has challenges that are...well, challenging! This game has both.

The storyline, while a bit gruesome, follows a logic and isn't just fluff surrounding hidden object finds. It is a real story.

The challenges...and not so difficult that I had to look up all the answers but they did give me a few moments of thinking to come up with the answers. I like that...I really hate having to look at a walkthrough because I'm so stuck I can't do anything. I like having to think things through.

I HIGHLY recommend this game. Not sure why some people are getting errors....I didn't have one error the entire game....ran flawlessly!

Thanks BFG....for giving us another great game!!

 
Laflamme
Stingray
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4,512 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by Laflamme on Jan 17, 10 9:22 AM
minxs wrote:Well, after playing another chapter, I have to eat my words about anachronisms not being in this game. I found:

-- a pretzel
-- matches? (could have been poisonous white phosphorus)
-- garlic?
-- a yam?
-- a chili pepper? (might be in period)
-- a bell pepper (definitely anachronistic)

(The clothes are generally 18th century in style, especially in the dress shop, so despite some Victorian elements, apparently the story is taken from the 18th-century original, String of Pearls.)



- "Garlic has been used as both food and medicine in many cultures for thousands of years, dating at least as far back as the time that the Giza pyramids were built." (Wikipedia)

- "Historical records in West Africa and of African yams in Europe date back to the sixteenth century. Yams were taken to the Americas through precolonial Portuguese and Spanish on the borders of Brazil and Guyana, followed by a dispersion through the Caribbean." (Wikipedia - I guess it will have come to Europe too)

- "The first "friction match" was invented by English chemist John Walker in 1826." (Wiki)

- "Chili peppers have been a part of the human diet in the Americas since at least 7500 BC. There is archaeological evidence at sites located in southwestern Ecuador that chili peppers were domesticated more than 6000 years ago,[2][3] and is one of the first cultivated crops in the Americas that is self-pollinating." (same)

- Pepper seeds were later carried to Spain in 1493 and from there spread to other European and Asian countries.

- "There are numerous accounts on the origin of the looped pretzels as well as the origin of the name. Most of them agree that they have religious and/or Christian backgrounds and were invented by monks. According to The History of Science and Technology, by Bryan Bunch and Alexander Hellemans, in 610 A.D. "...an Italian monk invents pretzels as a reward to children who learn their prayers."

 
scarlet_11dy6
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2,031 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by scarlet_11dy6 on Jan 17, 10 2:07 PM
looked for a long time for a "helm" which, when I finally took a hint turned out to be a helmet!


Not a mistake at all. That part of a suit of armor is properly termed a helm, not a helmet. A helm covers most of the face; a helmet does not. While I've seen ship's wheels misnamed as helms in HOGs, helm is properly the term for the spot on the deck of a ship where the wheel is located.

Laflamme, TYVM for addressing the anachronisms thing. Like to add that while a yam is a North American plant, so are potatoes & both were eaten in England in the late 18th century. That whole colonization thing. There was also an earlier type of match called a "lucifer" (b/c of the sulphurous smell?). Pretzels back then were not the crunchy things we're used to eating from a bag, but merely a salted & baked twist of dough. And while teddy bears didn't acquire their name & popularity until Theodore Roosevelt's early 20th century turn in the White House, stuffed toys themselves were certainly not a new concept (The Velveteen Rabbit, anyone?). There have been rag dolls etc for centuries.

 
azjmarie
Squid
Squid
70 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by azjmarie on Jan 17, 10 3:21 PM
I'm loving this game! The sound effects are well done, especially the rain storm. It makes me feel like I've been caught out in the cold rain with the eerie settings. The commentary by the British inspector is so much fun. Great job to the creators of this game. I know it sounds crazy, but I think I like it even more than Dire Grove.

 
azjmarie
Squid
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70 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by azjmarie on Jan 17, 10 11:17 PM
Just finished and thoroughly enjoyed it. No tech problems at all.
As much as I loved the game, to me the extras that come with Collector's Edition are not worth the price. Next time, I'll wait for the $6.99 edition.
A fun, spooky and well done game! Kudos to BFG!

 
minxs
Clownfish
Clownfish
615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 6:01 AM
Laflamme wrote:
minxs wrote:Well, after playing another chapter, I have to eat my words about anachronisms not being in this game. I found:

-- a pretzel
-- matches? (could have been poisonous white phosphorus)
-- garlic?
-- a yam?
-- a chili pepper? (might be in period)
-- a bell pepper (definitely anachronistic)

(The clothes are generally 18th century in style, especially in the dress shop, so despite some Victorian elements, apparently the story is taken from the 18th-century original, String of Pearls.)


- "Garlic has been used as both food and medicine in many cultures for thousands of years [rest deleted to save space, very interesting reading though...]" (Wikipedia)

- "Historical records in West Africa and of African yams in Europe date back to the sixteenth century. Yams were taken to the Americas through precolonial Portuguese and Spanish[...]" (Wikipedia - I guess it will have come to Europe too)

- "The first "friction match" was invented by English chemist John Walker in 1826." (Wiki)

- "Chili peppers have been a part of the human diet in the Americas since at least 7500 BC[...]" (same)

- "There are numerous accounts on the origin of the looped pretzels as well as the origin of the name. [...]."

Yes, I looked them all up too, just to be sure, but because something was in southern or eastern Europe or America doesn't mean it was in England at the same time! (LOL... thinking about UK food circa the 1960s! ) However things with a question mark could have been in London in the 18th or 19th century.

They had "Chilli pepper" sauce in the UK in the 18th century, but not so sure about fresh.

As for the matches, keep reading the Wiki! Safety matches, in a box or matchbook, were not invented until the late 1800s, in America. In the scene I was talking about, the matches were loose and could have been the dangerous early ones -- but later on I saw a matchbox, which is definitely19th c.

Same with pencils -- Brits had the only graphite mine in the world, but used square sticks of plain graphite until well into the 1800s.

I also noticed a typewriter in the "police station" (both anachronisms), and "bobbies" were originally called "Peelers" since Sir Robert Peel created the Metropolitan Police Force in London in 1829. [Oooops]

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 6:28:36 AM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
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Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 6:26 AM
I'm not sure when "Peelers" became "bobbies", but the interesting thing is that the bobby in the game also talks about "watchmen" (Tobias is going to become one), who were around in the 18th century and even earlier.

(I found a couple of interesting articles, one a review of a book about "The Great British Bobby" from the Guardian, by a former policeman, definitely not a rosy picture from either author or reviewer. Too bad we can't quote URLs, but just look up "history of the british bobby" and they're the first 2 links.)

This is from the first one, which according to the book review is somewhat inaccurate, for instance in saying that there were no civilian police before the Peelers.

The first thousand of Peel’s police, dressed in blue Tail-coats and top hats, began to patrol the streets of London on 29th September 1829. The uniform was carefully selected to make the ‘Peelers’ look more like ordinary citizens, rather that a red-coated soldier with a helmet.

The 'Peelers' were issued with a wooden truncheon carried in a long pocket in the tail of their coat, a pair of handcuffs and a wooden rattle to raise the alarm. By the 1880s this rattle had been replaced by a whistle.

To be a ‘Peeler’ the rules were quite strict. You had to be 6ft tall (or as near as possible), and have no history of any wrong-doings...

Early Victorian police worked seven days a week, with only five days unpaid holiday a year for which they received the grand sum of £1 per week. Their lives were strictly controlled; they were not allowed to vote in elections and required permission to get married and even to share a meal with a civilian. To allay the public’s suspicion of being spied upon, officers were required to wear their uniforms both on and off duty.


Wow, it makes you wonder what the citizens of Victorian England would have thought about the cameras everywhere and constant surveillance and spying of today! Those people evidently remembered that their ancestors were responsible for the Magna Carta and were not about to forget it.

From the book review:

"Peelers"
were not well received: rate-payers still had to pay for policing... but now had little control over what the officers did.

Discipline was strict, indeed so strict that of the 2,800 officers in the Met in 1830, only 562 were left by 1834. The first commissioners were concerned

[Ooops]

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 6:35:56 AM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
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615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 6:34 AM
that constables were seeking to conceal their warrant numbers from the public, becoming angry and officious, and "using their truncheons in any manner that may cause annoyance or irritation except when absolutely necessary". The final chapter of the book is aptly titled "Everything Changes, Everything Stays the Same".

Some things have changed. Juries were not always on the side of the police. When the first police officer was killed in a demonstration in 1833, the jury returned a verdict of justifiable homicide, and the verdict on an early death in police custody was "wilful murder by a police officer".

The history of women and minorities in policing is documented, from the first black officer, apparently recruited in Queen Victoria's reign in Carlisle, via the establishment of the first female officers during the manpower shortages of the first world war, to an openly gay man who joined the police in 1925. Emsley also details the prejudice and discrimination they suffered at the hands of the their colleagues and the public.

Off the bat, I would have called a black bobby an anachronism even in the 19th c. for sure. I wonder if Wiki has that correct?

Anyway, the issue of whether we are talking 18th or 19th century anachonisms flies out the window when you come to the lady's wardrobe above Sweeney's shop. The wardrobe has clothing items from the 18th to 20th c, and pictures pinned to the door of women in fashions from the 19th and 20th c. In fact I recognized some of the vintage images from my artwork -- I use them in collage and altered art since they are copyright-free.

Short, flipped hair and knee-length, full skirt with a tight waist? Looking exactly like a picture from my collection of 1940s and 50s sewing-pattern catalogues? Talk about anachronism!

Thanks for a very interesting response, LaFlamme! Also thanks for taking the trouble to quote all the history. It's fascinating... well, to some of us anyway!

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 6:49:23 AM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
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615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 6:57 AM
azjmarie wrote:I'm loving this game! The sound effects are well done, especially the rain storm. It makes me feel like I've been caught out in the cold rain with the eerie settings. The commentary by the British inspector is so much fun. Great job to the creators of this game. I know it sounds crazy, but I think I like it even more than Dire Grove.

<small voice>.... I think I like it better too... <end small voice>

I loved everything you did -- the rain and lightning were awesome -- and the moonlight and creepy, eerie settings combined with the music had me far more jumpy than DG! Very spooky.

I also thought the graphics were better, once I got over the initial "junk pile" effect and small size of some items in the hidden object scenes. I got a magnifying glass to avoid using hints, and really got to appreciate the artwork in both regular and H.O. scenes.

What did you think of the "Theater" scenes? I liked those too. In an ideal world, PlayPond would have taken a hint from BFG and turned those into videos from the actual musical -- wouldn't THAT have been awesome? -- but even so, they were entertaining.

The extras weren't worth the $13 to me (especially since, for me, the extras actually cost an additional $21 -- no, I will never stop complaining about this until BFG's best customers get some credit for all the games we buy), but the game itself was absolutely awesome. Kudos to the developers, who had me staring and shivering in appreciation and awe from the very first screen to the last!

And of course thanks to BF for bringing us this wonderful game -- AND for giving some customers 3 credits for the CE. Well done, everyone.

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 8:42:18 AM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
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615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 8:33 AM
scarlet_11dy6 wrote:And while teddy bears didn't acquire their name & popularity until Theodore Roosevelt's early 20th century turn in the White House, stuffed toys themselves were certainly not a new concept (The Velveteen Rabbit, anyone?). There have been rag dolls etc for centuries.

Hi scarlet: I addressed the other parts in the post to LaFlamme, but the game calls the toy a "teddy bear". That wouldn't have happened in Victorian or Georgian England; so, anachronism. As for The Velveteen Rabbit? Published in 1922.

Actually, as I didn't know until I finished the game, we're supposed to believe that it's the 18th or early 19th c. since the bobby at the end talks about "His Majesty's" government. So, unless it's gone all the way to 1901 -- which isn't consistent with most of the costumes and other details -- it's taking place in Georgian England. That's consistent with Penny Dreadfuls' String of Pearls which, though written in the 1840s, told a story which supposedly occurred in 1785, according to Wiki (and the OP, IIEvenRCAnymore).

Unfortunately for us, that "His" makes the bobby wrong. It would have been nearly treasonous for hoi polloi to talk about His Majesty's government during Victoria's reign -- as if the Queen could die! On the other hand, there were no bobbies in "His Majesty's" Georgian (III or IV) England. Oh dear.

ETA: No, I'm wrong. I forgot about William IV! It was under William that the bobbies came into being. The story could be taking place 1820-1830! Makes no difference to the anachronisms. but does let the bobby off the hook.

Other details -- especially police elements -- are consistent with the Edwardian era. Maybe the poorer people just hung onto those wigs and other Georgian clothes and household items for 70-80-100 years or so? Sweeney wasn't poor, but he was as nutty as a bedbug. Hmmm.

Well, this is fun, but it's silly to expect a game to research anachronisms to the degree of detail that we are doing -- at least they didn't have cigarettes, lighters, and hot dogs like practically every other H.O.G. ever made!

Now I want to see the movie to see If Tim Burton got the details right -- consistent either with the time when the story supposedly took place, or with the Penny Dreadful era in which it was written.

Anyway, I'll definitely be playing the next Penny Dreadful (and PlayPond is planning one, yay).

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 9:24:01 AM PST


 
minxs
Clownfish
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615 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by minxs on Jan 18, 10 9:33 AM
PS: What is the equivalent, under William IV, of "Georgian" or "Regency" or "Victorian"? Did he not last long enough to get an adjective? There are Georgian, Regency, and Victorian novels, clothes, furniture, etc. etc. -- is there anything for poor William?

Wilhelmian?

<resists quoting from Ferris Bueller's Day Off>

Edited on 01/18/2010 at 9:34:29 AM PST


 

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by crousewillet on Jan 18, 10 10:18 AM
This game is fantastic! Very nice graphics, challenging hidden objects and fun. Thanks Big Fish

 
samwise50
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160 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by samwise50 on Jan 18, 10 4:23 PM
Didn't resist long. I HAD to have it. I don't collect anything, except dust sometimes under furniture, but having purchased the CEs for Murder in the Rue Morgue and Dire Grove, I had to have this one too. Getting 3 credits doesn't hurt either. The only disappointment would be the "Theater" part. Skipped all of them after listening to the first one. Really, really annoying. Everything else was up to my expectations, which are becoming greater and greater, game after game.

Another piece of art! : 5 5

Thank you again

 
Shilom
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Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by Shilom on Jan 18, 10 4:29 PM
minxs wrote: Or how about The Monk? LOL!

I would LOVE a game based on Monk, hes one of my favorite detectives!

 
scarlet_11dy6
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2,031 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by scarlet_11dy6 on Jan 18, 10 5:06 PM
I am enjoying minxs' doctoral history thesis far too much LOL

And no, I don't think William got a descriptive adjective. I always found it amazing that George III had like 16 kids & the throne ended up going to a granddaughter b/c none of his sons could breed properly.

Do the Bow Street Runners count as Georgian? I know they count as Regency period. Maybe that's who our coppers are, b/c this tale def takes place in 1785. Tho I do believe there was a forerunner of Sweeney Todd in the Jacobin era waaaay back at the start of the 1600s where this idea came from. James I was kind of obsessed w/ stuff like that & wrote books about it & such, but the details escape me atm.....go fish LOL

I give PlayPond an A for effort b/c of the plethora of not only period-correct items, but for giving them the proper British names.....who knew a crumpet looked like a pancake? I always thunk it was a cookie (or biscuit to not be anachronistic). I was quite disappointed that tho I came across trifle & recognized it posthaste, there was a teaser in a review elsewhere that said there was a nice Geordie treat called spotted d-i-c-k (I know the filter will get that ROFL but it's the name of a dessert, honest) & I've yet to come across it. I'm waiting on the reg version b4 buying tho I was greedy & demo'd it @ PP as well. This is giving the German fishies' dictionaries a workout, I bet. I figure they tried pretty hard to get it right despite a few things that weren't.

What I find astonishing is that this is only PPs 2nd venture into HOGdom. What was their 1st, you might inquire? My fav straight HOG, Mystery Legends: Sleepy Hollow, which was also top-notch for atmosphere & historical striving for accuracy. I guess they're not working on the sequel to that yet if they've put this much effort into ST. I wish on the game's info pg BFG would list who made a game b/c PPs are def worth purchasing.

 
nwl43
Stingray
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4,931 Posts

Re:Welcome to Penny Dreadfuls™ Sweeney Todd Collector`s Edition forum

[Post New]by nwl43 on Jan 18, 10 6:16 PM
I have only played the demo and I absolutely loved it. I don't normally like games that are mostly HOG, but this one is fabulous. Loved the scenes, the opera and the policeman's voice. Even loved the snarky comments when I tried something ridiculous. I think this one will set a new bar for HOG. I'm going to wait for the regular version and will be most anxiously awaiting its arrival.

 
 
 
 
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