New to this!

[Post New]by zambonizelda on Jul 7, 11 2:02 PM
I enjoy the graphics of this match game but am not sure I understand the game's goals. I am brand new to match games. Is there a general description of how to play to which I can turn when in doubt about what I should do? How about when I get stuck? For example, I don't know how to get the key to the chest when there is a break in the chain. Anyone?

 

Re:New to this!

[Post New]by Little_Jimmy on Jul 7, 11 3:33 PM
Hello there,

The match-3 game play is basically simple. In this game there are four temples (that are the seasons) and each temple are ruled by a type of match-3. So you can play the swap mode, pop mode, token in hand mode and chain mode.

If I'm not wrong, there are two main goals in this game. The first one is to collect the golden tiles (by making matches on them). So after you collect all of them, it's released the key and chest goal. Where you need to lead the key to the chest.

Don't forget to use the arrows to rotate the board during the key and chest. Actually you can use the arrow any time during the game to make a best strategy (like other fishes have posted here).

There are some levels where you need to use a kind of teleport to move the key between two points. You can do it by leading the key to the first teleport. Tthen you need to click on it and then click on the other teleport to move the key.

If you get stuck in the game, you can find some help here on the forum or there is the game's help.

Cheers

 
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Re:New to this!

[Post New]by SynthpopAddict on Jul 7, 11 5:14 PM
Welcome to the pond, zambonizelda

Just to explain Little_Jimmy's statements a little more...Dreams of a Geisha has four different styles of "match 3" games. Most match 3 games are played by swapping one piece with another on a board so that three or more of one color line up and the matched pieces go away and others fill into the empty spaces. This is generally called the "swap" style of M3. Dreams of a Geisha has this style of play in the temple of spring. The other 3 temples feature less common styles of M3 play, "pop" (where you click on a cluster of 3 or more of the same color to clear them all at once), "token in hand" (where your cursor has a piece on it and you have to find a matching pair of the same type on the board to place your cursor's piece next to; this will cause your cursor to pick up a different color piece as a trade) and "chain" (where you click and drag out a path of matching colors in the playfield of 3 or more). In each game mode, the object is to clear all the gold and silver tiles in the board. There will be various obstacles such as chained squares that will get in your way and need to be removed by multiple matches over them so that you can reach the gold and silver tiles. The game also has various powerups that appear in the board to help you out. One feature that DoaG has which other M3s don't is that you get to rotate the board 90 degrees whenever you want by clicking the turn arrows at the upper corners or right clicking. This changes how the pieces fall into the playfield and is essential for solving the second part of the puzzles on every board (key puzzles).

The key puzzles involve making matches around the key to cause it to drop down a path defined by the dotted lines. You will have to rotate the board to get the key to keep moving since it can only go down and also to fill in empty spaces so that you can keep matching around the key to get it to drop. The object is to get the key to fall onto the chest. Multiple keys/chests appear in higher levels and the pathways get more convoluted. Enjoy, and hope that helps!

Edited on 07/07/2011 at 5:22:03 PM PST


 

Re:New to this!

[Post New]by zambonizelda on Jul 8, 11 7:53 AM
Terrific! Thanks to both of you for helping me to make sense of this game. It seems I've begun my Match 3 experience with a relatively complex, yet beautiful and inviting (now) version. That's good . I also think I can now figure out the spinning tiles. So, with morning coffee in hand . . . right back at it! Thanks again.

 
 
 
 
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