Daxadillion
Barracuda
Barracuda
3,292 Posts

I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by Daxadillion on Jun 15, 15 1:11 PM
I was born and bred in the UK and although we share a common language with you in the USA, some terms you use are very different to the UK English language and sometimes I don't understand what you are talking about.

I do understand that you call what we call Trousers are called Pants in the USA, as Pants in the UK are generally referred to as underwear garments for both male or females and I have finally understood that after 50 plus years.

So I would just like to know what a Cookie Cutter game means?

I also came across a post that said it was a Vanilla game - what does that mean?

I would appreciate it if someone or many someones would explain the above 2 questons to me.

Thank You

Dax

 

Re:I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by pondprowler on Jun 15, 15 2:50 PM
A cookie-cutter is a piece of metal formed into a shape that you want your cookies in, like a star. When you use the cookie-cutter, ALL the cookies are EXACTLY the same size and shape.
Tha's what a cookie-cutter game is, the same as all other games.

Vanilla means "boring" or no excitement. We have a ice-cream store that is famous for it's 31 flavors, but if you can't decide then you just go for the plain ol vanilla.

Hope that helps.

~pp

 
Valdy
Marlin
Marlin
9,383 Posts

Re:I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by Valdy on Jun 15, 15 2:51 PM
"Cookie Cutter" is pretty obvious. When you make biscuits you often use a cookie cutter, so all the biscuits look the same when they are done.

Vanilla: think of an ice cream flavour. Which one is the most basic one? Vanilla means that the game has nothing special added, that it's pretty ordinary. That kind of thing.

 
Bartsister
Clownfish
Clownfish
710 Posts

I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by Bartsister on Jun 15, 15 4:15 PM
Daxadillion wrote:I was born and bred in the UK and although we share a common language with you in the USA, some terms you use are very different to the UK English language and sometimes I don't understand what you are talking about.

I do understand that you call what we call Trousers are called Pants in the USA, as Pants in the UK are generally referred to as underwear garments for both male or females and I have finally understood that after 50 plus years.

So I would just like to know what a Cookie Cutter game means?

I also came across a post that said it was a Vanilla game - what does that mean?

I would appreciate it if someone or many someones would explain the above 2 questons to me.

Thank You

Dax


Glad you got some helpful answers there. What I personally find amusing about the wide usage of the term "cookie cutter" lately is that it is being used as a complaint that everything is the same but the posters who are using it can't seem to be able to think of another phrase except cookie cutter. We had the exact same phenomenon a few years ago when a group of people were complaining that ERS games were all "same old, same old." It was slightly ironic, in my opinion, that it was the "same old" term that every one of them used. Kind of a cookie cutter kind of complaint if you get my drift.

Sorry, guys. Couldn't help myself. Was just too tempting.

 
Daxadillion
Barracuda
Barracuda
3,292 Posts

Re:I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by Daxadillion on Jun 15, 15 11:25 PM
To Pondprowler, Valdy and Bartsister

I interpreted one wrongly, i.e. Vanilla - bland, so I think I was close, and Cookie Cutter as sweet/cutesy, I was wrong on that one!

Thank you

Dax

 
angelfish106
Pufferfish
Pufferfish
1,378 Posts

I Have Been Meaning to Ask this for Months.

[Post New]by angelfish106 on Jun 16, 15 4:32 AM
Daxadillion wrote:I was born and bred in the UK and although we share a common language with you in the USA, some terms you use are very different to the UK English language and sometimes I don't understand what you are talking about. Dax


There's a famous saying......The UK and the USA are two countries divided by a common language!

I got the 'cookie-cutter' reference as meaning exactly the same but must admit I didn't get the 'vanilla' one. I tend to think of vanilla as a scent (in candles, which I hate) as opposed to a taste. But I understand it now

 
 
 
 
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