LizzieK
Whale Shark
Whale Shark
16,190 Posts

The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by LizzieK on Jun 1, 10 3:14 AM
For me this game has a game within the game. When I first saw a golf club listed as a spoon I naturally assumed that it was a mistake. Then I saw “clew of rope” in the list of items and I thought “Oh dear, I don’t know what a clew is.” Then I saw “mosquito hawk” in the list and I thought this must be some kind of bird that eats mosquitoes. Then I saw “Ladybird” and it turned out to be what I call a ladybug. I thought to myself that must be a typo error.

I began to write down each of the unfamiliar item names as I encountered them, making a list of the odd descriptions or labels of the various items in the game. At the end of the demo time I decided to buy the game. I was enjoying the innovation of several aspects of the game and as a lark, I wanted to continue my unusual word search.

When I encounter the terms that were strange to my mind like, clew, Ladybird, mosquito hawk, jack plane, secateur, cotton wool, aubergine, stub and others, they forced me to stretch my mind, to think outside of the box and to use my imagination to determine what I should look for in the scene. Sometimes I resorted to using a hint but more often I found that by thinking outside the normal constraints of my language comfort zone I could ferret out the item hiding on the screen. As I progressed through the game I found that a new dimension of the game was developing for me.

Sometimes I would exit the game and go on the internet to search for the new and unfamiliar terms. My internet searches revealed some pretty interesting stuff.

My first search was for the word clew. I found that in Greek myth the clew is the ball of thread which Ariadne gave to Theseus, the Athenian hero. By unwinding it, the clew guided him through the labyrinth that Daedalus had made for King Minos. But the clew is also the life-line, spun and rolled into a ball by the Fates at birth and unraveled throughout one's life. In both senses, it is a guide through life's perplexities; the key is to find your clew and to learn how to follow it, for otherwise you are lost in the labyrinth of life.

Continued ………

Edited on 06/01/2010 at 3:56:50 AM PST


 
LizzieK
Whale Shark
Whale Shark
16,190 Posts

Re:The challenge within the game

[Post New]by LizzieK on Jun 1, 10 3:15 AM
Part 2
A simple dictionary search for the word spoon gave these results: Number three wood. Golf: a club with a wooden head whose face has a greater slope than the brassie or driver, for hitting long, high drives from the fairway. This brought to mind my late father who was an avid golfer. I bet he would have known that a spoon was a three wood. It was nice to have this small memory of him on this Memorial Day weekend.

Mosquito hawk was another intriguing term. Dragonflies were not named due to their looks but due to their large powerful jaws, which they use to consume prey. Dragonflies are sometimes referred to as mosquito hawks. This may be due to the species habit of killing mosquitoes. An adult dragonfly can eat hundreds of mosquitoes a day, as well as consuming a variety of flies and other insects. Due to their keen sense of vision, dragonflies are often able to catch their prey in mid-flight and will consume them without landing.

Another dictionary search for Ladybird resulted in - beetle, short for Our Lady’s bird. Then I searched for Our Lady’s Bird and found a fascinating account of how from medieval times this tiny creature that I know as the ladybug was thought to enjoy the special protection of Our Lady the Virgin Mary and so was called Our Lady’s bird, ladybird for short. There is a very interesting article about this on the internet.

When I saw Cotton Wool I thought how can cotton be wool? Wool is from animals and cotton is from a plant. Further research told me that Cotton Wool is the name for the natural raw form of cotton. The picture in the hidden object scene appeared to be exactly that, a raw unprocessed ball of cotton.

There are many more of these imaginative words in this game. These are just a few of the interesting things that I learned when I looked at the strangely unfamiliar words in this game in a different light.

Edited on 06/01/2010 at 3:21:12 AM PST


 

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Spookypookywooky on Jun 1, 10 4:23 AM
All these words are just the English (rather than American) versions of the words you are familiar with. I felt the same when I first started playing hidden object games - the American versions of words were confusing to me (still are sometimes). I have to use the Windows button to pop out of the game and do a quick Google search for list items sometimes because I don't have a clue what they're referring to. Considering we're meant to have a common language, it's interesting just how many objects we refer to by different terms.

Edited on 06/01/2010 at 4:27:26 AM PST


 
tv9725
Lobster
Lobster
85 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by tv9725 on Jun 1, 10 6:34 AM
some get way to upset about language barriers
when i come across a game like this i figure its been written by someone in another language first and just a weird translation into english
or rather american english lol
i started doing the same thing i didnt make an actual list but when i saw a word i had no clue i would start looking around and after 5 mins or so use a hint and say oh wow never would have called it that lol
your right it becomes a game within the game makes it more interesting for me
but like i said some get way to upset about language
but then i use bad english so i dont mind lol

 

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by BarbaraFish on Jun 1, 10 11:12 AM
I too am enjoying this word puzzle aspect of the game. I have made a list, mostly for my hubby and will share what i've accumulated so far. The above posts have mentioned a few already.

brioche = brooch
stepler = stapler
chest expander = think multiple bands of rubber; exercise equipment
stub = stump
roll = scroll or in one instance sushi
oil box = looked like a cooking pan with handle
domra = stringed instrument kinda like a guitar
amphorae = amphora or 2 handled vase/vessel
fly agaric = red mushroom
plaice = brown fish
swellfish = blowfish
shockfish = stingray

--- more

 

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by BarbaraFish on Jun 1, 10 11:18 AM
strange words continued

nail drawer = crowbar
lady birds = ladybug
lamp = florescent light bulb
jewel = another brooch
nettle = a small branch of leaves
badger dog = dachshund
aubergine = eggplant
klaxon = musical horn type instrument
football = soccer ball, of course
sledge = sled

I like this. The word game makes me smile and like the others, quite a few i found without the hint button. It's fun to learn new stuff. hehe enjoy!

 
Janie42
Clownfish
Clownfish
598 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Janie42 on Jun 1, 10 2:41 PM
Posts re the word meanings, etc. in this thread are so funny--thanks!

 
Mr_Russ
Whale Shark
Whale Shark
16,662 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Mr_Russ on Jun 1, 10 3:02 PM
Some of them are UK English and some are just odd.

Amphorae is the plural of amphora, a two-handled vase.

 
genkicoll
Stingray
Stingray
5,732 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by genkicoll on Jun 1, 10 3:23 PM
I'm happy to have the list. I made a similar one for the game Vampire Saga: Pandora's Box (it's posted there somewhere ).

Thanks so much to those of you who are posting lists, and to LizzieK for the thread and the positive outlook

 
Ridnhi
Guppy
Guppy
115 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Ridnhi on Jun 15, 10 1:12 PM
Thanks Barbara Fish for your excellent explanation of how a game can broaden our outlook and recognize also that everything doesn't revolve around those of us from America. You put it so well and I agree intoto. I too love to be stretched and if we plan on keeping our minds sharp this is an excellent way to be sure we stay in shape mentally. We are in this game playing for fun and to help fill up time for us little old ladies who live alone or whose kids are grown. Lighten up folks. Its all about having fun and THINKING..............

 
Catghost
Herring
Herring
315 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Catghost on Jul 26, 10 9:01 AM
It must be my being Dutch that I don't have any problems whatsoever with the words used to describe the objects to be found.
At school we learned to speak (and read and write) 'the queen's english'. As life progressed it was inevitable that I picked up a word or two 'american' and I'm fluent in German, so that helps too. And fyi: an aubergine (eggplant) is called an aubergine in dutch too. But I totally enjoyed reading this topic, esp. the story of how the ladybird got her (or his ) name.

 
Sissy79
Guppy
Guppy
118 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Sissy79 on Sep 7, 10 2:59 PM
Hello my fellow fishies! I am truly impressed with ALL the reviews (at this thread), about this game... I usually don't purchase a game unless I know that it will be 1.) Long enough for my $$'s worth, and 2.)If I will actually be challenged and/or entertained with the game. I was really skeptical about this one only because it didn't appear long enough for my taste, but apon reading JUST THIS THREAD I have decided to go ahead and get it! I like an interesting challenge, and it seems this would be BOTH interesting as well as laid back enough to help me forget the bad things happening all around me lately. (I just had surgery on Friday for my hip, and was expecting for the surgery to help, not make it worse which is what happened), and I believe this game will help to take my mind far, far away yet still be enough to be considered "brain food"! lolol So, a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who was so positive about something new and different!! You all get a GREAT BIG gold for the rest of the month from me!!
Happy Gaming!!
and to ALL--
Sissy

 
Valdy
Marlin
Marlin
9,383 Posts

Re:The HIDDEN CHALLENGE within the game

[Post New]by Valdy on Sep 11, 10 12:49 PM
Catghost wrote:It must be my being Dutch that I don't have any problems whatsoever with the words used to describe the objects to be found.
At school we learned to speak (and read and write) 'the queen's english'. As life progressed it was inevitable that I picked up a word or two 'american' and I'm fluent in German, so that helps too. And fyi: an aubergine (eggplant) is called an aubergine in dutch too. But I totally enjoyed reading this topic, esp. the story of how the ladybird got her (or his ) name.


I too have no problems (am an English and German speaker), and I think in the newer version of this game, some of the words seem to have been corrected (I only bought this game a few days ago).

I also know the eggplant as aubergine, and the English say 'ladybird', not 'ladybug'. In fact, I always wondered why I keep having to look for ladybugs instead of ladybirds. LOL Now I know - it's the American version.
And the 'football' is called 'football' in the UK.

Also, in my version of the game, the stingray was called a stingray and the crowbar a crowbar - among other things.

Edited on 09/11/2010 at 12:49:50 PM PST


 
 
 
 
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