Posts created by Barrendur

 
 
 posted in Namariel Legends: Iron Lord on Aug 25, 14 8:27 PM
This is one of the good ones! I bought it and I've played it through; it's a lot of fun... and not a HO in sight. (Since I find HO games in most varieties incredibly tedious, the absence is... A... GOOD... THING.)

The character graphics are good and the scenery is a visual delight, particularly the steampunk-y parts. The villains are menacing enough -- and powerful enough -- that the player feels entirely justified fighting against them; there are moments where the robotic soldiers of the Iron Lord seem VERY threatening. Yes, these are Very Bad Guys and they will do Very Bad Things to you, and to the entire world, if you don't stop them.

Your task -- stop the Iron Lord -- is a challenge and a struggle, but never hopeless. The Hint key is quick and useful; several times when I got stuck, I used it to point me to an item I'd missed or overlooked. Sometimes it indicated that an object I'd just assumed couldn't be used here actually COULD. "Hint" is just what the names says; a nudge towards something the player hasn't thought of, or was wrong about.

The game stays interesting throughout -- and it stays *sensible* (logical in terms of the choices presented). The story -- and the player's involvement in it -- makes sense, as a series of plausible choices that thinking beings really might make... IF they were faced with trolls, spirits, a magic world-tree and an army of giant robots. Sensible -- just not likely. ;-) Tasks the player performs in the game make sense in terms of the goal; what the player has to do in any individual task always furthers that goal.

Mini-games and challenges likewise make sense in this game; they're EASY to MODERATE difficulty, though sometimes rather time-consuming, but I enjoyed them all. Not only were there no boring, unconvincing HOS games, but no Sudoko (or whatever that number-grid game is called, the one that requires you to add the numbers in a grid up, down, across and diagonally to make... er, 15?) Anyway, to my relief, none of that tedious crap appeared....

In fact, all the mini-games/challenges were NEW to me, and *that* is worth its weight in gold.

I just thoroughly enjoyed this entire game. It was fun and fantastical, with cyberpunk graphics and traditional fantasy characters; there were always things for the player to do, and the story, while ultimately rather "stock", was interestingly and imaginatively delivered. It was a good time, and I recommend it.







 
 
 posted in The Mirror Mysteries: Forgotten Kingdoms on Mar 3, 13 11:50 PM
Ahh, it's a wonderful game. I really enjoyed it.

Yes, it's a trifle on the short side overall; there are three worlds to visit plus the home world, and I would have welcomed twice as many. Because it's so smooth and interesting -- the hidden objects are an inherent part of the story, and finding them is part of the process of "solving" each world -- the game plays fast. It's consistent, fascinating and lovely to look at, and I hope there'll be a sequel very soon!

The game tells an interesting story; the vengeful and evil mirror from a previous game has returned and captured the heroine's brother, carrying him off into one of several interconnected mirror worlds. She has to pursue them through a wonderful steampunk world (complete with trains, flying cities and commercials for both), a Sino-Japanese-Thai land of temples, and winds up in a rundown urban underworld. The puzzles and hidden objects are all seamlessly interwoven with the graphically and visually lush setting; I loved the way this game looked in each world.

Puzzles? They're fun, definitely part of the story, but actually dead easy... though working out what the player is supposed to do and how to do it can be a bit of a challenge. The hidden objects are more challenging than the puzzles, and there is some interaction as they are found and placed. I thought the game made sense within its narrative; unlike many other computer games, this one didn't display glaring inconsistencies or anachronisms in its puzzles/hidden objects/settings.

And for those of you that like voiceovers, the heroine and the mirror are both well acted and very convincing; the lost brother not so much so. <grin>The actor voicing the mirror was having a great deal of fun unleashing his inner Tim Curry.

I enjoyed this game immensely, and though I got it on a BigFish game coupon, I'd have been happy to pay the full $6.99 for it. Have a look!
 
 
 posted in The Mirror Mysteries: Forgotten Kingdoms on Feb 28, 13 2:50 PM
Ahh, it's a wonderful game. I really enjoyed it.

Yes, it's a trifle on the short side overall; there are three worlds to visit plus the home world, and I would have welcomed twice as many. Because it's so smooth and interesting -- the hidden objects are an inherent part of the story, and finding them is part of the process of "solving" each world -- the game plays fast. It's consistent, fascinating and lovely to look at, and I hope there'll be a sequel very soon!

The game tells an interesting story; the vengeful and evil mirror from a previous game has returned and captured the heroine's brother, carrying him off into one of several interconnected mirror worlds. She has to pursue them through a wonderful steampunk world (complete with trains, flying cities and commercials for both), a Sino-Japanese-Thai land of temples, and winds up in a rundown urban underworld. The puzzles and hidden objects are all seamlessly interwoven with the graphically and visually lush setting; I loved the way this game looked in each world.

Puzzles? They're fun, definitely part of the story, but actually dead easy... though working out what the player is supposed to do and how to do it can be a bit of a challenge. The hidden objects are more challenging than the puzzles, and there is some interaction as they are found and placed. I thought the game made sense within its narrative; unlike many other computer games, this one didn't display glaring inconsistencies or anachronisms in its puzzles/hidden objects/settings.

And for those of you that like voiceovers, the heroine and the mirror are both well acted and very convincing; the lost brother not so much so. <grin>The actor voicing the mirror was having a great deal of fun unleashing his inner Tim Curry.

I enjoyed this game immensely, and though I got it on a BigFish game coupon, I'd have been happy to pay the full $6.99 for it. Have a look!
 
 
 posted in Azada® : In Libro Collector's Edition on Jul 29, 12 11:46 AM
Does the bonus material in the CE reveal or resolve the fate of the unicorn that's held captive in the black magician's castle (towards the end of the game)?

As an ingredient of one of the potions you have to make, you must include a lock of rainbow-coloured hair from the captive unicorn locked in a cage in the black magician's castle. But after that scene where you obtain the hair, you can no longer interact with the unicorn and the unicorn is never shown again. Nor is its fellow captive, the cyclops.

Does the CE of the game have any more information about the unicorn and the cyclops? Do they appear in game any further and are you able to free them? I'm fascinated by these minor characters and would like to know their stories.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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